marketing case study format example

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Marketing case study format example

This MarketingSherpa case study is super detailed and describes the process by which MarketingSherpa helped a natural foods company boost revenue by 18 percent with a site redesign. You see the entire project from start to finish.

Since this marketing case study focused on design, visuals were imperative. Let your business and its niche guide the way in which you construct your case study. It should be geared toward other businesses or customers who might benefit from your business. You might notice that many companies publish numerous marketing case studies.

You can either choose a project that has already concluded or one that is starting or underway. Decide which segment of your target audience you want to appeal to first. Next, select a case study subject closely related to that segment. You want your marketing case study to resonate with the leads you most want to convert. Decide what parts of the case study you want to highlight.

You might have several key points. When you can provide numbers, do so. Make it exciting! Add sensory details, frustration points, and colorful anecdotes. It needs to engage the reader so he or she keeps going until the end. If possible, intersperse the copy with images. Make them relevant and easy to see on the screen. As mentioned above, results are paramount. If you can express them in numeric form, so much the better. Consider creating a custom graphic to serve as the featured image on your post.

That way, people can share the image on social. Add the amazing result to the text on the image to entice people to click. The point here is to capture attention. As long as you maintain that attention, you have a good chance of converting the lead. Add images and leading lines to keep the visitor engaged. Remember that color matters.

Open up the forum for more insights. Invite readers to ask you direct questions about your business, products, services, or methods. Not only that, but respond to those comments. Take each one as a gift. These comments might tell you what type of case study you should create next or allow you to cement a conversion by answering objections or questions.

Marketing case studies can improve your conversion rate , but you have to put in the time and effort. Remember that trust matters when it comes to converting leads into customers. A great marketing case study demonstrates your track record. The solution might lie in tripwire marketing. The te. Consumers have become increasingly blind to marketing and advertising strategies. Your content marketing strategy influences how you reach your audience. What Is a Case Study in Marketing?

Hypothesis for strategy : Tell your audience what you expected to happen after you implemented your strategy for the customer or client. Implementation of strategy : Take the reader through the step-by-step process you used to help your customer or client.

Results of strategy : Deliver the results in as much detail as possible, preferably with a quote from the client or customer. Concluding findings : Explain what this case study has taught your specifically and how it can help other people.

Which company would you trust most? Why is it so important to build trust? MarketingSherpa This MarketingSherpa case study is super detailed and describes the process by which MarketingSherpa helped a natural foods company boost revenue by 18 percent with a site redesign. Choose a success story that is closely related to your potential customer You might notice that many companies publish numerous marketing case studies. Identify the key points of the case study and use storytelling Decide what parts of the case study you want to highlight.

Highlight the great results As mentioned above, results are paramount. Ask for feedback! For more information, check out our privacy policy. Written by Braden Becker BradenBecker. Earning the trust of prospective customers can be a struggle. Before you can even begin to expect to earn their business, you need to demonstrate your ability to deliver on what your product or service promises. Sure, you could say that you're great at X, or that you're way ahead of the competition when it comes to Y.

But at the end of the day, what you really need to win new business is cold, hard proof. Below, I'll walk you through what a case study is, how to prepare for writing one, what you need to include in it, and how it can be an effective tactic. To jump to different areas of this post, click on the links below to automatically scroll.

A case study examines a person's or business's specific challenge or goal, and how they solved for it. Case studies can vary greatly in length and focus on a number of details related to the initial challenge and applied solution. In professional settings, it's common for a case study to tell the story of a successful business partnership between a vendor and a client.

Whether it's a brief snapshot of your client's health since working with you, or a long success story of the client's growth, your case study will measure this success using metrics that are agreed upon by the client you're featuring. Perhaps the success you're highlighting is in the number of leads your client generated, customers closed, or revenue gained.

Any one of these key performance indicators KPIs are examples of your company's services in action. When done correctly, these examples of your work can chronicle the positive impact your business has on existing or previous customers. To help you arm your prospects with information they can trust, we've put together a step-by-step guide on how to create effective case studies for your business -- as well as free case study templates for creating your own. Get them using the form above, and then get creating using the steps below.

Telling your customer's story is a delicate process — you need to highlight their success while naturally incorporating your business into their story. If you're just getting started with case studies, we recommend you download HubSpot's Case Study Templates. Included are three plain-text and three designed templates to explain how your customers thrived while using your product or service.

Download Now. All business case studies are designed to demonstrate the value of your services, but they can focus on several different client objectives. Your first step when writing a case study is to determine the objective or goal of the subject you're featuring. In other words, what will the client have succeeded in doing by the end of the piece? The client objective you focus on will depend on what you want to prove to your future customers as a result of publishing this case study.

Next, you'll determine the medium in which you'll create the case study. In other words, how will you tell this story? Case studies don't have to be simple, written one-pagers. Using different media in your case study can allow you to promote your final piece on different channels.

For example, while a written case study might just live on your website and get featured in a Facebook post, you can post an infographic case study on Pinterest, and a video case study on your YouTube channel. Consider writing this case study in the form of an ebook and converting it to a downloadable PDF. Then, gate the PDF behind a landing page and form for readers to fill out before downloading the piece, allowing this case study to generate leads for your business.

Plan on meeting with the client and shooting an interview. Seeing the subject, in person, talk about the service you provided them can go a long way in the eyes of your potential customers. Use the long, vertical format of an infographic to tell your success story from top to bottom. As you progress down the infographic, emphasize major KPIs using bigger text and charts that show the successes your client has had since working with you.

Podcasts are a platform for you to have a candid conversation with your client. This type of case study can sound more real and human to your audience -- they'll know the partnership between you and your client was a genuine success. Writing about your previous projects requires more than picking a client and telling a story. You need permission, quotes, and a plan. To start, here are a few things to look for in potential candidates. It helps to select a customer who's well-versed in the logistics of your product or service.

That way, he or she can better speak to the value of what you offer in a way that makes sense for future customers. Clients that have seen the best results are going to make the strongest case studies. If their own businesses have seen an exemplary ROI from your product or service, they're more likely to convey the enthusiasm that you want prospects to feel, too. One part of this step is to choose clients who have experienced unexpected success from your product or service.

When you've provided non-traditional customers -- in industries that you don't usually work with, for example -- with positive results, it can help to remove doubts from prospects. While small companies can have powerful stories, bigger or more notable brands tend to lend credibility to your own -- in some cases, having brand recognition can lead to Customers that came to you after working with a competitor help highlight your competitive advantage, and might even sway decisions in your favor.

To get the case study candidate involved, you have to set the stage for clear and open communication. That means outlining expectations and a timeline right away -- not having those is one of the biggest culprits in delayed case study creation. Most importantly at this point, however, is getting your subject's approval.

When first reaching out to your case study candidate, provide them with the case study's objective and format -- both of which you will have come up with in the first two steps above. To get this initial permission from your subject, put yourself in their shoes -- what would they want out of this case study? Although you're writing this for your own company's benefit, your subject is far more interested in the benefit it has for them.

Here are four potential benefits you can promise your case study candidate to gain their approval. Explain to your subject whom this case study will be exposed to, and how this exposure can help increase their brand awareness both in and beyond their own industry. In the B2B sector, brand awareness can be hard to collect outside one's own market, making case studies particularly useful to a client looking to expand their name's reach.

Allow your subject to provide quotes with credits back to specific employees. When this is an option to them, their brand isn't the only thing expanding its reach -- their employees can get their name out there, too. This presents your subject with networking and career-development opportunities they might not have otherwise.

This is a more tangible incentive you can offer your case study candidate, especially if they're a current customer of yours. If they agree to be your subject, offer them a product discount -- or free trial of another product -- as a thank-you for their help creating your case study. Here's a benefit that is sure to resonate with your subject's marketing team: If you publish your case study to your website, and your study links back to your subject's website -- known as a "backlink" -- this small gesture can give them website traffic from visitors who click through to your subject's website.

Additionally, a backlink from you increases your subject's page authority in the eyes of Google. This helps them rank more highly in search engine results and collect traffic from readers who are already looking for information about their industry. Once your case study candidate approves of your case study, it's time to send them a release form.

A case study release form tells you what you'll need from your chosen subject, like permission to use any brand names and share the project information publicly. Kick off this process with an email that runs through exactly what they can expect from you, as well as what you need from them. To give you an idea of what that might look like, check out this sample email:. This document can vary, depending on factors like the size of your business, the nature of your work, and what you intend to do with the case studies once they are completed.

That said, you should typically aim to include the following in the Case Study Release Form:. As noted in the sample email, this document serves as an outline for the entire case study process. Other than a brief explanation of how the customer will benefit from case study participation, you'll want to be sure to define the following steps in the Success Story Letter. First, you'll need to receive internal approval from the company's marketing team.

Once approved, the Release Form should be signed and returned to you. It's also a good time to determine a timeline that meets the needs and capabilities of both teams. To ensure that you have a productive interview -- which is one of the best ways to collect information for the case study -- you'll want to ask the participant to complete a questionnaire prior to this conversation.

That will provide your team with the necessary foundation to organize the interview, and get the most out of it. Once the questionnaire is completed, someone on your team should reach out to the participant to schedule a to minute interview, which should include a series of custom questions related to the customer's experience with your product or service.

After the case study is composed, you'll want to send a draft to the customer, allowing an opportunity to give you feedback and edits. Once any necessary edits are completed, send a revised copy of the case study to the customer for final approval. Once the case study goes live -- on your website or elsewhere -- it's best to contact the customer with a link to the page where the case study lives.

Don't be afraid to ask your participants to share these links with their own networks, as it not only demonstrates your ability to deliver positive results, but their impressive growth, as well. Before you execute the questionnaire and actual interview, make sure you're setting yourself up for success.

A strong case study results from being prepared to ask the right questions. What do those look like? Here are a few examples to get you started:. Keep in mind that the questionnaire is designed to help you gain insights into what sort of strong, success-focused questions to ask during the actual interview. And once you get to that stage, we recommend that you follow the "Golden Rule of Interviewing.

It's actually quite simple -- ask open-ended questions. If you're looking to craft a compelling story, "yes" or "no" answers won't provide the details you need. Focus on questions that invite elaboration, such as, "Can you describe? In terms of the interview structure, we recommend categorizing the questions and flow into six specific sections that will mirror a successful case study format.

Combined, they'll allow you to gather enough information to put together a rich, comprehensive study. The goal of this section is to generate a better understanding of the company's current challenges and goals, and how they fit into the landscape of their industry. Sample questions might include:.

In order to tell a compelling story, you need context. That helps match the customer's need with your solution. Exploring how the customer arrived at the decision to work with you helps to guide potential customers through their own decision-making processes.

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This type of case study can sound more real and human to your audience -- they'll know the partnership between you and your client was a genuine success. Writing about your previous projects requires more than picking a client and telling a story.

You need permission, quotes, and a plan. To start, here are a few things to look for in potential candidates. It helps to select a customer who's well-versed in the logistics of your product or service.

That way, he or she can better speak to the value of what you offer in a way that makes sense for future customers. Clients that have seen the best results are going to make the strongest case studies. If their own businesses have seen an exemplary ROI from your product or service, they're more likely to convey the enthusiasm that you want prospects to feel, too.

One part of this step is to choose clients who have experienced unexpected success from your product or service. When you've provided non-traditional customers -- in industries that you don't usually work with, for example -- with positive results, it can help to remove doubts from prospects. While small companies can have powerful stories, bigger or more notable brands tend to lend credibility to your own -- in some cases, having brand recognition can lead to Customers that came to you after working with a competitor help highlight your competitive advantage, and might even sway decisions in your favor.

To get the case study candidate involved, you have to set the stage for clear and open communication. That means outlining expectations and a timeline right away -- not having those is one of the biggest culprits in delayed case study creation. Most importantly at this point, however, is getting your subject's approval. When first reaching out to your case study candidate, provide them with the case study's objective and format -- both of which you will have come up with in the first two steps above.

To get this initial permission from your subject, put yourself in their shoes -- what would they want out of this case study? Although you're writing this for your own company's benefit, your subject is far more interested in the benefit it has for them. Here are four potential benefits you can promise your case study candidate to gain their approval. Explain to your subject whom this case study will be exposed to, and how this exposure can help increase their brand awareness both in and beyond their own industry.

In the B2B sector, brand awareness can be hard to collect outside one's own market, making case studies particularly useful to a client looking to expand their name's reach. Allow your subject to provide quotes with credits back to specific employees. When this is an option to them, their brand isn't the only thing expanding its reach -- their employees can get their name out there, too. This presents your subject with networking and career-development opportunities they might not have otherwise.

This is a more tangible incentive you can offer your case study candidate, especially if they're a current customer of yours. If they agree to be your subject, offer them a product discount -- or free trial of another product -- as a thank-you for their help creating your case study. Here's a benefit that is sure to resonate with your subject's marketing team: If you publish your case study to your website, and your study links back to your subject's website -- known as a "backlink" -- this small gesture can give them website traffic from visitors who click through to your subject's website.

Additionally, a backlink from you increases your subject's page authority in the eyes of Google. This helps them rank more highly in search engine results and collect traffic from readers who are already looking for information about their industry.

Once your case study candidate approves of your case study, it's time to send them a release form. A case study release form tells you what you'll need from your chosen subject, like permission to use any brand names and share the project information publicly. Kick off this process with an email that runs through exactly what they can expect from you, as well as what you need from them.

To give you an idea of what that might look like, check out this sample email:. This document can vary, depending on factors like the size of your business, the nature of your work, and what you intend to do with the case studies once they are completed. That said, you should typically aim to include the following in the Case Study Release Form:.

As noted in the sample email, this document serves as an outline for the entire case study process. Other than a brief explanation of how the customer will benefit from case study participation, you'll want to be sure to define the following steps in the Success Story Letter.

First, you'll need to receive internal approval from the company's marketing team. Once approved, the Release Form should be signed and returned to you. It's also a good time to determine a timeline that meets the needs and capabilities of both teams. To ensure that you have a productive interview -- which is one of the best ways to collect information for the case study -- you'll want to ask the participant to complete a questionnaire prior to this conversation.

That will provide your team with the necessary foundation to organize the interview, and get the most out of it. Once the questionnaire is completed, someone on your team should reach out to the participant to schedule a to minute interview, which should include a series of custom questions related to the customer's experience with your product or service. After the case study is composed, you'll want to send a draft to the customer, allowing an opportunity to give you feedback and edits.

Once any necessary edits are completed, send a revised copy of the case study to the customer for final approval. Once the case study goes live -- on your website or elsewhere -- it's best to contact the customer with a link to the page where the case study lives. Don't be afraid to ask your participants to share these links with their own networks, as it not only demonstrates your ability to deliver positive results, but their impressive growth, as well.

Before you execute the questionnaire and actual interview, make sure you're setting yourself up for success. A strong case study results from being prepared to ask the right questions. What do those look like? Here are a few examples to get you started:. Keep in mind that the questionnaire is designed to help you gain insights into what sort of strong, success-focused questions to ask during the actual interview. And once you get to that stage, we recommend that you follow the "Golden Rule of Interviewing.

It's actually quite simple -- ask open-ended questions. If you're looking to craft a compelling story, "yes" or "no" answers won't provide the details you need. Focus on questions that invite elaboration, such as, "Can you describe? In terms of the interview structure, we recommend categorizing the questions and flow into six specific sections that will mirror a successful case study format.

Combined, they'll allow you to gather enough information to put together a rich, comprehensive study. The goal of this section is to generate a better understanding of the company's current challenges and goals, and how they fit into the landscape of their industry. Sample questions might include:. In order to tell a compelling story, you need context.

That helps match the customer's need with your solution. Exploring how the customer arrived at the decision to work with you helps to guide potential customers through their own decision-making processes. The focus here should be placed on the customer's experience during the onboarding process. The goal of this section is to better understand how the customer is using your product or service.

In this section, you want to uncover impressive measurable outcomes -- the more numbers, the better. When it comes time to take all of the information you've collected and actually turn it into something, it's easy to feel overwhelmed. Where should you start? What should you include? What's the best way to structure it? To help you get a handle on this step, it's important to first understand that there is no one-size-fits-all when it comes to the ways you can present a case study. They can be very visual, which you'll see in some of the examples we've included below, and can sometimes be communicated mostly through video or photos, with a bit of accompanying text.

Whether your case study is primarily written or visual, we recommend focusing on the seven-part outline, below. Note: Even if you do elect to use a visual case study, it should still include all of this information, but presented in its intended format. To help you visualize this case study outline, check out the case study template below, which can also be downloaded here. When laying out your case study, focus on conveying the information you've gathered in the most clear and concise way possible.

Make it easy to scan and comprehend, and be sure to provide an attractive call-to-action at the bottom -- that should provide readers an opportunity to learn more about your product or service. Once you've completed your case study, it's time to publish and promote it. Some case study formats have pretty obvious promotional outlets -- a video case study can go on YouTube, just as an infographic case study can go on Pinterest.

But there are still other ways to publish and promote your case study. Here are a couple of ideas:. As stated earlier in this article, written case studies make terrific lead-generators if you convert them into a downloadable format, like a PDF.

To generate leads from your case study, consider writing a blog post that tells an abbreviated story of your client's success and asking readers to fill out a form with their name and email address if they'd like to read the rest in your PDF. As a growing business, you might need to display your case study out in the open to gain the trust of your target audience. Rather than gating it behind a landing page, publish your case study to its own page on your website, and direct people here from your homepage with a "Case Studies" or "Testimonials" button along your homepage's top navigation bar.

You drove the results, made the connect, set the expectations, used the questionnaire to conduct a successful interview, and boiled down your findings into a compelling story. And after all of that, you're left with a little piece of sales enabling gold -- a case study.

To show you what a well-executed final product looks like, have a look at some of these marketing case study examples. When branding and design studio Corey McPherson Nash showcases its work, it makes sense for it to be visual -- after all, that's what they do.

So in building the case study for the studio's work on the New England Journal of Medicine's integrated advertising campaign -- a project that included the goal of promoting the client's digital presence -- Corey McPherson Nash showed its audience what it did, rather than purely telling it. Notice that the case study does include some light written copy -- which includes the major points we've suggested -- but really lets the visuals do the talking, allowing users to really absorb the studio's services.

What's interesting about this case study is the way it leads with the customer. This reflects a major HubSpot credo, which is to always solve for the customer first. The copy leads with a brief description of why Shopify uses HubSpot, and is accompanied by a short video and some basic statistics on the company. Notice that this case study uses mixed-media. Yes, there is a short video, but it's elaborated upon in the additional text on the page.

So, while case studies can use one or the other, don't be afraid to combine written copy with visuals to emphasize the project's success. Here's a design company that knows how to lead with simplicity in its case studies. As soon as the visitor arrives at the page, he or she is greeted with a big, bold photo, and two very simple columns of text -- "The Challenge" and "The Outcome. Immediately, IDEO has communicated two of the case study's major pillars.

Then, there are the cases when visuals can tell almost the entire story -- when executed correctly. Network security provider WatchGuard is able to do that through this video, which tells the story of how its services enhanced the attendee and vendor experience at the Windmill Ultimate Frisbee tournament.

A video case study could be a compelling way to attract potential customers who prefer watching a video over reading text. Additionally, a video allows you to convey customer emotion. This case study by Pioneer Business Systems , for instance, allows viewers to see firsthand the effects Pioneer's telephone system had on their clients, ElliotLee Estate Agents.

It includes text, as well, to thoughtfully organize and break-up the video into sections. Fractl uses both text and graphic design on their Sapio case study web page to immerse the viewer in a more interesting user experience. For instance, as you scroll, you'll see the results are illustrated in an infographic-design form as well as the text itself.

Further down the page, they use icons like a heart and a circle to illustrate their pitch angles, and graphs to showcase their results. Rather than writing which publications covered their news story, they incorporated the media outlet's icons for further visual diversity. What's the best way to showcase the responsiveness and user interface of a website?

Probably by diving right into it, via video -- which is exactly what Fantasy does on their case study page for USA Today. They keep the page simple and clean, with a large red play button embedded at the top, inviting you to review their redesign of USA Today's website via video. The video itself is simple, showing the website's interface and clicking on various links with simple instrumental music in the background.

If you're more interested in text, you can scroll to find their goal, "make USA Today's website responsive", in one short paragraph, followed by a simple "1" icon, with the text "Became the most visited US News site. A video is a phenomenal way to grab a viewer's attention, but in our video-heavy world today, it can be hard to keep potential customers' eyes on the screen.

They also occasionally cut away from his face to include full-screen text. By incorporating graphic designs and text in their video, App Annie encourages viewers to stay engaged. Bitly takes a different approach to text-heavy case studies, by providing their case study of ecommerce company Vissla in PDF form. Since the PDF opens in a separate browser, it's easier for the viewer to avoid distractions as they scroll the pages.

It can be risky to include hurdles to your case studies, but with great risk comes great reward, right? In Infegy's case, their gated content is worth the fill-out form information, particularly since their client is such a big name in the automobile industry: Lexus. The PDF case study reads like a compelling news article, including titles like "The Rise of Lexus" and "The Fall of Lexus", colorful pie charts, and real online comments from customers who were unhappy with Lexus' old holiday ads.

The PDF is six pages but features big font and plenty of white space, so viewers can easily skim it in only a few minutes. OH Partners doesn't let superfluous details distract from the most important themes of their case study -- "The Situation", "The Solution", and "The Success".

Each one of their case studies, including this Fiesta Bowl one , is organized into those three categories, with a video at the beginning followed by a few large font, easily skimmable paragraphs. Best of all, OH Partners puts other case studies on the left side of the page, with highly enticing visuals to ensure a potential consumer can continue perusing the case studies until they're confident in OH Partner's track record.

Digitas' case study page for LVNG With , a cancer support community created by AstraZeneca, is one of the more emotionally moving campaigns in our list and might even evoke a few tears. The page begins with a heart-wrenching video of all the moments -- a grandmother holding her grandchild, someone riding a roller coaster -- that "weren't supposed to happen", exemplifying the enormous gift a single day could be to a terminal patient.

Scrolling down, it's obvious that Digitas kept AstraZeneca at the forefront of their strategy, but more than that, they used real people as their focal point. What first attracted me to RichRelevance's Wine. Adding an abridged version to a case study enables you to attract a larger audience, by offering a quick-read for those short on time, and a longer version for those interested in the details.

RichRelevance's case study also offers an impressive amount of information for those wanting to understand the nuances of their strategy, including a section titled "Fine-tuning Recommendations by Geography". SlideShare is a platform that allows you to encourage engagement from your viewers -- which is likely why Netherlands-headquartered Uniface chose to use a SlideShare for their customer case study. As you click to the right you're able to easily read their process from challenge to solution, and they provide a link to the full case study, and their social media accounts, on the last slide.

Since each slide only needs a few lines of text, the SlideShare feels especially digestible. While Asana's case study design looks initially text-heavy, there's good reason -- it reads like a creative story, and is told entirely from the customer's perspective. Amp Agency's Patagonia marketing strategy aimed to appeal to a new audience through guerilla marketing efforts and a coast-to-coast roadtrip. Their case study page effectively conveys a voyager theme, complete with real photos of Patagonia customers from across the U.

Personally, I liked Amp Agency's storytelling approach best, which captures viewers' attention start-to-finish simply because it's an intriguing and unique approach to marketing. Budweiser's one page, poster-esque case study is a good reflection of a brand knowing its audience. Anomaly's case study for Budweiser appears edgy and modern, with a design that playfully pushes the text to the right as it showcases pictures of social media influencers wearing a campaign-related t-shirt.

Both the top and the bottom of the page are eye-catching, and the text itself is simple and straightforward. Sometimes, starting with the results is the best way to capture your readers' attention. In Clinique's case study , AdRoll does just that, beginning with some impressive numbers: "8.

Once it has boldly outlined their results, AdRoll smartly pulls back to discuss the "Benefits of Personalized Ads", letting the viewer consider how these same benefits might help their own company. The page is short and sweet and ends with a compelling call-to-action -- "AdRoll has generated revenues in excess of seven billion for its customers. Try it now. If your case study results benefited people, there's likely no better way to showcase that than through on-screen interviews.

If you've got a case study with dense text, one of the more creative solutions to breaking it up could be to organize it by pages. Levi's case study uses this method -- their page one, for instance, is labeled "Introduction", while page two is labeled "Weaknesses in the late s". Each page tackles a different topic, and the design makes it feel more like reading a book than a business article.

What's great about CTP's case study page for their Red Sox Season Campaign is their combination of video, images, and text -- a video automatically begins playing when you visit the page, and as you scroll, you'll see additional embedded videos of Red Sox players, a compilation of print ads, and social media images you can click to enlarge.

At the bottom, it says "Find out how we can do something similar for your brand. Sometimes, simple is key. Genuine's case study for BIC razor's is straightforward and minimal, with only two short paragraphs, "The Insight" and "The Solution", accompanied by two images. The simplicity of the page allows the reader to focus on the sense of humor in the text, like "Helping a consumer find their perfect match and making them smile along the way means gaining a brand loyalist for life.

Or until they grow a beard. Despite its length, Apptio's case study is appealing enough to keep viewer's attention. Zendesk's Airbnb case study reads like a blog, and focuses equally on Zendesk and Airbnb, highlighting a true partnership between the companies. To captivate readers, it begins like this: "Halfway around the globe is a place to stay with your name on it. At least for a weekend. In a case study meant to highlight Zendesk's helpfulness, nothing could be more authentic than their decision to focus on Airbnb's service in such great detail.

If you didn't know this video was a case study for Hootsuite , you'd assume it was simply an artsy video capturing Herschel's startup success.

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